Substance Abuse treatment talks about "spirituality", but it fails to provide the necessary spirit guidence for people to grow. Children’s book author Yuyi Morales writes a gratitude letter to the librarian who had a big impact on her. Dalai lama ( and other bhuddists) understanding of emotions is surprisingly simple and powerful. Social-emotional learning is a well-known idea, even if implementation is slow; putting experienced meditators, monks etc. Connecting across generations is one of the oldest happiness practices there is. My question is then what has happened in the near twenty years since this meeting was convened? The book was written as the proceedings of the eighth Mind and Life meeting, having as the main topic destructive emotions. Emotions are not bad, but if we make ourselves think so it can lead to self-destructive behavior. Destructive Emotions is an abridged account of a series of presentations and conversations that unfolded over a several day conference between the Dali Lama and several leading scientists in the study of emotions. You most undestand science before you can critizice it intelligently. Read it! A great primer for anyone who wants to get some knowledge on neuroscience. What if we didn't take good things for granted, and recognized all the kindness we receive from others? Self Pity is one of the most destructive and yet most prevalent emotions that I encounter in life as a Pastor talking to people. If there is a Destructive Emotions SparkNotes, Shmoop guide, or Cliff Notes, you can find a link to each study guide below. Sheer brilliance The book is a dialogue to analyse what constitute destructive Emotions. It brought together the more philosophical side of Buddhism (which could be considered one of the world's oldest and most effective psychologies) with Western psychology. Episode 81: Are You Listening to Your Elders. Get this from a library! A little background on me: At a time when adversity led to anger that was destroying my physical and mental health (those that know me can easily locate that abyss in time), I found the book Destructive Emotions by the Dalai Lama and Daniel Goleman. The format of the book was a little difficult to track at times as the author was the recorder and mediator over a week long conference which included the Dalai Lama and various psychologists, monks and professors. Two studies examined the relationship between frequent social comparisons and destructive emotions and behaviors. Social-emotional learning is a well-known idea, even if implementation is slow; putting experienced meditators, monks etc. Even better if this hope is supported by hard science and fuelled by buzzwords like neuroplasticity and mindfulness. The biographies of the participants are as interesting as the topic of the discussion. “The Extraordinary Persons Project In fact, Ekman had been so moved personally—and intrigued scientifically—by his experiments with Öser that he announced at the meeting he was planning on pursuing a systematic program of research studies with others as unusual as Öser. I really appreciated the melding of minds between neuroscientists and Buddhist monks. For example, it is normal to experience sadness when someone dies, but a depressed person is sad in an inappropriate situation or to an inappropriate degree. CiteSeerX - Document Details (Isaac Councill, Lee Giles, Pradeep Teregowda): Social comparisons may seem to serve several positive functions, including self-enhancement. Destructive emotions : a dialogue with the Dalai Lama. Rated 4.2 over 2,500 reviews on Goodreads. We may describe an emotion that is all-in appropriate as "apt." Furthermore, he has found distinct connections between cognitive and emotional processes in the same areas of the brain—a neurological link between what we think and what we feel. In one session, Richard Davidson, a psychologist at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, presents startling research about how the brain acts before, during, and after emotional states. It also provides antidotes of astonishing psychological sophistication–which are now being confirmed by modern neuroscience. Their confrontational and punitive fashion is profoundly confused and their poor outcome is prove of its failing. It does not feel like we have entered a new world of positive psychology and grounded optimism. Science Center • Highly informative. The format of the book was a little difficult to track at times as the author was the recorder and mediator over a week long conference which included the Dalai Lama and various psychologists, monks and professors. There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Make yourself familiar with … These out-of-control emotions muscle their way into the human mind and heart, pushing aside more healing emotions such as empathy, compassion and peace. Neo-Confucianism and Buddhism claim that some human emotions are inherently good, and others almost always afflictive, destructive, and bad. Frequent social comparisons, however, have a dark side. Perhaps the most enlightening implication of Destructive Emotions is that rigorous scientific study of emotions, positive and negative, is making exciting progress. Davidson’s conversation with the Dalai Lama resonated in the presentation by Mark Greenberg, who has extensive experience teaching emotional skills to children. Such a lack of egoism, Ekman added, “from the psychological viewpoint, is remarkable.” Third is a compelling personal presence that others find nourishing. And yet Ekman now was proposing to study people who excel in a range of admirable human qualities. Refresh and try again. This goodness goes beyond some fuzzy, warm aura and reflects with integrity the true person. Buddhism defines destructive behavior as acting compulsively under the influence of disturbing emotions and negative habits. In order to better portrait the participants, The author also gives some short information about their lives and what motivates them in their research. The marrying of eastern and western perspectives is valuable, informative, and much needed. Very rarely have psychologists—particularly ones as eminent as Paul Ekman—shifted their scientific lens to focus on people who were in some sense (other than intellectually) far above normal.